VALUABLE POETRY: As I Grew Older by Langston Hughes.

It was a long time ago.
I have almost forgotten my dream.
But it was there then,
In front of me,
Bright like a sun—
My dream.
And then the wall rose,
Rose slowly,
Slowly,
Between me and my dream.
Rose until it touched the sky—
The wall.
Shadow.
I am black.
I lie down in the shadow.
No longer the light of my dream before me,
Above me.
Only the thick wall.
Only the shadow.
My hands!
My dark hands!
Break through the wall!
Find my dream!
Help me to shatter this darkness,
To smash this night,
To break this shadow
Into a thousand lights of sun,
Into a thousand whirling dreams
Of sun!

SOURCE: https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/as-i-grew-older/

With respect.

VALUABLE POETRY: Golden Slumbers by Thomas Dekker.

Golden slumbers kiss your eyes,
Smiles awake you when you rise;
Sleep, pretty wantons, do not cry,
And I will sing a lullaby,
Rock them, rock them, lullaby …

Memorably used by The Beatles as the lyrics for their song of the same name on the Abbey Road LP, ‘Golden Slumbers’ is a beautiful lullaby from Thomas Dekker’s 1603 play Patient Grissel, written with Henry Chettle and William Haughton.

This is one of the most soothing and beautiful poems of the Renaissance – and perhaps the best-known Renaissance lullaby, or ‘cradle song’, out there.

SOURCE: https://interestingliterature.com/2020/05/beautiful-poems-english-language/

With respect.

VALUABLE POETRY: The True Meaning Of Life by Pat A. Fleming.

It’s been almost two weeks, I could not share the poems. Stringent workloads. I’m not feeling good with this interruption of my flow of writing. I still need to more relentless when it comes to writing. Still I took it as challenge to move ahead. 

ABOUT THE POET:

I was born and raised in the Trenton, NJ area, one of three children of Irish descent. I discovered my Calling to be a Psychiatric Social Worker after doing volunteer work at the local state hospital during high school. After graduating from College, I joined Volunteers In Service To America (now Americorps) and was sent to work in a school for juveniles called Samarkand Manor in North Carolina. After one year of service, I returned home and was hired at the Trenton Psychiatric Hospital as a social worker. I went on to transfer to the Forensic section of the hospital which later became it’s own Forensic Center. I retired in 2016 after 36 years of doing what I loved. I always enjoyed writing from the time I was young, and satisfied that itch when I was a social worker by writing the best Social Histories on my patients. After I retired, I started writing nonstop. I am strictly amateur, no real training, so it’s more of a hobby, but I so treasure reading and posting poems on this site. I am humbled by some of the talent here.

What’s Important In Life

I have been through hard times, I’ve struggled like everyone else to find contentment, peace and an understanding of what life is really about. I believe age has everything to do with finally knowing what life is really about which is who we are and not what we have.

The Years have passed by,

In the blink of an eye,

Moments of sadness,

And joy have flown by.

People I loved,

Have come and have gone,

But the world never stopped,

And we all carried on.

Life wasn’t easy,

And the struggles were there,

Filled with times that it mattered,

Times I just didn’t care.

I stood on my own,

And I still found my way,

Through some nights filled with tears,

And the dawn of new days.

And now with old age,

It’s become very clear,

Things I once found important,

Were not why I was here.

And how many things,

That I managed to buy,

Were never what made me,

Feel better inside.

And the worries and fears,

That plagued me each day,

In the end of it all,

Would just fade away.

But how much I reached out,

To others when needed,

Would be the true measure,

Of how I succeeded.

And how much I shared,

Of my soul and my heart,

Would ultimately be,

What set me apart.

And what’s really important,

Is my opinion of me,

And whether or not,

I’m the best I can be.

And how much more kindness,

And love I can show,

Before the Lord tells me,

It’s my time to go.

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/the-true-meaning-of-life

https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/user/patricia-a-fleming/

VALUABLE POETRY: “Tears Fall in My Heart” – Paul Verlaine.

About the poet:

Paul Verlaine

PABLO VERLAINE (1844-1896). Credit: Album / Oronoz

Paul Verlaine was born on March 30, 1844 and became one of the greatest and most popular of French poets. Born in Metz, he was educated in Paris and began a post in the civil service. He started writing poetry at an early age and his first collection, Poemes saturniens was published in 1867.Verlaine’s work reflected his private life beginning with his love for Mathilde Maute, who later became his wife. By 1872 he had lost interest in her, and effectively abandoned her and their son, preferring the company of his homosexual lover, Arthur Rimbaud. Verlaine was a heavy drinker, and shot Rimbaud in a jealous rage, injuring him not killing him. As an indirect result of the incident, he was arrested and imprisoned at Mons, where he underwent a religious conversion, which again influenced his work. Romances sans paroles was the poetic outcome of this period.

Following his release, Verlaine travelled to England, where he worked for some years as a teacher and worked on another successful collection, Sagesse. He returned to France in 1877, and, while teaching English at a school in Rethel, became infatuated with one of his pupils, Lucien Letinois, who inspired further poems. Verlaine was devastated when the boy died of typhoid fever.

Verlaine’s last years witnessed a descent into alcoholism, insanity, and poverty. Yet even in his lifetime, his poetry was recognised as ground-breaking. Perhaps the best-known of Verlaine’s poems is Chanson d’automne, largely thanks to its use as a code message for the Allies during the Second World War. Verlaine’s poetry was also popular with musicians, such as Faure, who set several of his poems, including La bonne chanson.

Paul Verlaine died in 1896 and is buried in Paris.
Bibliography source: knowledgerush.com

Tears fall in my heart

Rain falls on the town;

what is this numb hurt

that enters my heart?

Ah,the soft sound of rain

on roofs, on the ground!

To a dulled heart they came,

ah, the song of the rain!

Tears without reason

in the disheartened heart.

What? no trace of treason?

This grief’s without reason.

It’s far the worst pain

to never know why

without love or disdain

my heart has such pain!

SOURCE: https://allpoetry.com/Paul-Verlaine

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/best-famous-poems-ever-written

With respect.

Valuable poetry: “Sea Fever” – John Masefield.

About the poet:

https://cdn.britannica.com/s:700×500/41/133541-050-2627FCEB/John-Masefield.jpg

John Masefield

British poet

John Masefield, (born June 1, 1878, Ledbury, Herefordshire, Eng.—died May 12, 1967, near Abingdon, Berkshire), poet, best known for his poems of the sea, Salt-Water Ballads (1902, including “Sea Fever” and “Cargoes”), and for his long narrative poems, such as The Everlasting Mercy (1911), which shocked literary orthodoxy with its phrases of a colloquial coarseness hitherto unknown in 20th-century English verse.

Educated at King’s School, Warwick, Masefield was apprenticed aboard a windjammer that sailed around Cape Horn. He left the sea after that voyage and spent several years living precariously in the United States. His work there in a carpet factory is described in his autobiography, In the Mill (1941). He returned to England, worked for a time as a journalist for the Manchester Guardian, and settled in London. After he succeeded Robert Bridges as poet laureate in 1930, his poetry became more austere.

Other of Masefield’s long narrative poems are Dauber (1913), which concerns the eternal struggle of the visionary against ignorance and materialism, and Reynard the Fox (1919), which deals with many aspects of rural life in England. He also wrote novels of adventure—Sard Harker (1924), Odtaa (1926), and Basilissa (1940)—sketches, and works for children. His other works include the poetic dramas The Tragedy of Nan (1909) and The Tragedy of Pompey the Great (1910), as well as a further autobiographical volume, So Long to Learn (1952). Masefield was awarded the Order of Merit in 1935.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,

And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by;

And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking,

And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.

I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide

Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;

And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,

And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,

To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife;

And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,

And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.

SOURCES: https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Masefield-British-poet

https://www.theodysseyonline.com/best-famous-poems-ever-written

With respect.

Valuable poetry: A Girl by Ezra Pound.

ABOUT THE POET:

http://art-sheep.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Ezra_Pound_1963.jpg

1885–1972

Ezra Pound is generally considered the poet most responsible for defining and promoting a modernist aesthetic in poetry. In the early teens of the twentieth century, he opened a seminal exchange of work and ideas between British and American writers, and was famous for the generosity with which he advanced the work of such major contemporaries as W. B. Yeats, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, H. D., James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, and especially T. S. Eliot.

His own significant contributions to poetry begin with his promulgation of Imagism, a movement in poetry which derived its technique from classical Chinese and Japanese poetry—stressing clarity, precision, and economy of language and foregoing traditional rhyme and meter in order to, in Pound’s words, “compose in the sequence of the musical phrase, not in the sequence of the metronome.” His later work, for nearly fifty years, focused on the encyclopedic epic poem he entitled The Cantos.

Ezra Pound was born in Hailey, Idaho, on October 30, 1885. He completed two years of college at the University of Pennsylvania and earned a degree from Hamilton College in 1905. After teaching at Wabash College for two years, he travelled abroad to Spain, Italy, and London, where, as the literary executor of the scholar Ernest Fenellosa, he became interested in Japanese and Chinese poetry. He married Dorothy Shakespear in 1914 and became London editor of the Little Review in 1917.

In 1924, he moved to Italy; during this period of voluntary exile, Pound became involved in Fascist politics, and did not return to the United States until 1945, when he was arrested on charges of treason for broadcasting Fascist propaganda by radio to the United States during World War II. In 1946, he was acquitted, but declared mentally ill and committed to St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D.C. During his confinement, the jury of the Bollingen Prize for Poetry (which included a number of the most eminent writers of the time) decided to overlook Pound’s political career in the interest of recognizing his poetic achievements, and awarded him the prize for the Pisan Cantos (1948). After continuous appeals from writers won his release from the hospital in 1958, Pound returned to Italy and settled in Venice, where he died, a semi-recluse, on November 1, 1972.


Selected Bibliography

Poetry

A Draft of Cantos XXXI-XLI (1934)
A Draft of XXX Cantos (1930)
A Lume Spento (1908)
Cantos I-XVI (1925)
Cantos LII-LXXI (1940)
Cantos XVII-XXVII (1928)
Canzoni (1911)
Exultations (1909)
Homage to Sextus Propertius (1934)
Lustra and Other Poems (1917)
Patria Mia (1950)
Personae (1909)
Provenca (1910)
Quia Pauper Amavi (1919)
The Cantos (1972)
The Fifth Decade of Cantos (1937)
The Pisan Cantos (1948)
Umbra: Collected Poems (1920)

Prose

ABC of Economics (1933)
Antheil and the Treatise on Harmony (1924)
Digest of the Analects (1937)
Gaudier Brzeska (1916)
Guide to Kulchur (1938)
How To Read (1931)
Imaginary Letters (1930)
Indiscretions (1923)
Instigations (1920)
Jefferson and/or Mussolini (1935)
Literary Essays (1954)
Make It New (1934)
Pavannes and Divisions (1918)
Polite Essays (1936)
Prolegomena: Volume I (1932)
Selected Prose: 1909-1965 (1973)
Social Credit and Impact (1935)
The ABC of Reading (1934)
The Spirit of Romance (1953)
What is Money For? (1939)

Anthology

Cathay (1915)
The Classic Anthology Defined (1954)
The Great Digest, and the Unwobbling Point (1951)
The Translations of Ezra Pound (1953)

The tree has entered my hands,
The sap has ascended my arms,
The tree has grown in my breast-
Downward,
The branches grow out of me, like arms.

Tree you are,
Moss you are,
You are violets with wind above them.
A child – so high – you are,
And all this is folly to the world.

SOURCES: https://poets.org/poet/ezra-pound

https://100.best-poems.net/girl.html

With respect.

Valuable poetry: My heart leaps up by William Wordsworth.

My heart leaps up when I behold
A rainbow in the sky:
So was it when my life began;
So is it now I am a man;
So be it when I shall grow old,
Or let me die …

This simple nine-line poem describes how the poet is filled with joy when he sees a rainbow, and how he hopes he will always keep that sense of enchantment with the natural world. The poem contains Wordsworth’s famous declaration, ‘The Child is father of the Man’, highlighting how important childhood experience was to the Romantics in helping to shape the human beings they became in adult life.

SOURCE: https://interestingliterature.com/2018/07/10-of-the-best-poems-by-english-romantic-poets/

With respect.

Valuable poetry: “There Will Come Soft Rain” by Sara Teasdale.

I rushed myself to write every day. I took in a both good and bad attitude and mind-set. But I would like to be stable/broad and moreover in a sequential too. Started having bad memory too. I must take care. Over the last two weeks, I forgot and missed to post it. But I still love to post it today.

ABOUT THE POET:

Sara Teasdale

American poet.

Sara Teasdale, in full Sara Trevor Teasdale, (born August 8, 1884, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.—died January 29, 1933, New York, New York), American poet whose short, personal lyrics were noted for their classical simplicity and quiet intensity.

Teasdale was educated privately and made frequent trips to Chicago, where she eventually became part of Harriet Monroe’s Poetry magazine circle. Her first published poem appeared in the St. Louis, Missouri, weekly Reedy’s Mirror in May 1907, and later that year she published her first volume of verse, Sonnets to Duse, and Other Poems. A second volume, Helen of Troy, and Other Poems, followed in 1911. She married in 1914 (having rejected another suitor, the poet Vachel Lindsay), and in 1915 her third collection of poems, Rivers to the Sea, was published. She moved with her husband to New York City in 1916. In 1918 she won the Columbia University Poetry Society prize (forerunner of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry) and the annual prize of the Poetry Society of America for Love Songs (1917). During this time she also edited two anthologies, The Answering Voice: One Hundred Love Lyrics by Women (1917), and Rainbow Gold for Children (1922).

Teasdale’s poems are consistently classical in style. She wrote technically excellent, pure, openhearted lyrics usually in such conventional verse forms as quatrains or sonnets. Her growth as a poet is nonetheless evident in Flame and Shadow (1920), Dark of the Moon (1926), and Stars To-night (1930). The poems in these collections evince an increasing subtlety and economy of expression. Teasdale’s marriage ended in divorce in 1929, and she lived thereafter the life of a semi-invalid. In 1933, in frail health after a recent bout of pneumonia, she took her own life with an overdose of barbiturates. Her last and perhaps finest collection of verse, Strange Victory, was published later that year. Her Collected Poems appeared in 1937.

There will come soft rain and the smell of the ground,

And swallows circling with their shimmering sound;

And frogs in the pools singing at night,

And wild plum trees in tremulous white;

Robins will wear their feathery fire,

Whistling their whims on a low fence-wire;

And not one will know of the war, not one

Will care at last when it is done.

Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree,

If mankind perished utterly;

And Spring herself, when she woke at dawn

Would scarcely know that we were gone.

https://commaful.com/play/sydney/there-will-come-soft-rain/

Source: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sara-Teasdale

This poetry has taken from Medium.com 31 of the Best and Most Famous Short Classic Poems Of All Time.

With respect.

VALUABLE POETRY: Face To Face by Rabindranath Tagore.

This poetry supposed to post on day before yesterday. I forgot badly. All right, I still wanna post it.

ABOUT THE POET:

https://cdn.britannica.com/s:700×500/48/134948-050-10E316E2/Rabindranath-Tagore.jpg

Rabindranath Tagore, Bengali Rabīndranāth Ṭhākur, (born May 7, 1861, Calcutta [now Kolkata], India—died August 7, 1941, Calcutta), Bengali poet, short-story writer, song composer, playwright, essayist, and painter who introduced new prose and verse forms and the use of colloquial language into Bengali literature, thereby freeing it from traditional models based on classical Sanskrit. He was highly influential in introducing Indian culture to the West and vice versa, and he is generally regarded as the outstanding creative artist of early 20th-century India. In 1913 he became the first non-European to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Day after day, O lord of my life,
shall I stand before thee face to face.
With folded hands, O lord of all worlds,
shall I stand before thee face to face.

Under thy great sky in solitude and silence,
with humble heart shall I stand before thee face to face.

In this laborious world of thine, tumultuous with toil
and with struggle, among hurrying crowds
shall I stand before thee face to face.

And when my work shall be done in this world,
O King of kings, alone and speechless
shall I stand before thee face to face.

SOURCE: https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/face-to-face/

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Rabindranath-Tagore

With respect.

Valuable poetry: “The World Is Too Much with Us” – William Wordsworth.

About the poet:

https://media.poetryfoundation.org/uploads/media/default/0001/16/34de255b59e296bc2233879e044bdca257f8b21c.jpeg?w=1274&h=&fit=max&1274

William Wordsworth

1770–1850

On April 7, 1770, William Wordsworth was born in Cockermouth, Cumbria, England. Wordsworth’s mother died when he was eight—this experience shapes much of his later work. Wordsworth attended Hawkshead Grammar School, where his love of poetry was firmly established and, it is believed, he made his first attempts at verse. While he was at Hawkshead, Wordsworth’s father died leaving him and his four siblings orphans. After Hawkshead, Wordsworth studied at St. John’s College in Cambridge and before his final semester, he set out on a walking tour of Europe, an experience that influenced both his poetry and his political sensibilities. While touring Europe, Wordsworth came into contact with the French Revolution. This experience as well as a subsequent period living in France, brought about Wordsworth’s interest and sympathy for the life, troubles, and speech of the “common man.” These issues proved to be of the utmost importance to Wordsworth’s work. Wordsworth’s earliest poetry was published in 1793 in the collections An Evening Walk and Descriptive Sketches. While living in France, Wordsworth conceived a daughter, Caroline, out of wedlock; he left France, however, before she was born. In 1802, he returned to France with his sister on a four-week visit to meet Caroline. Later that year, he married Mary Hutchinson, a childhood friend, and they had five children together. In 1812, while living in Grasmere, two of their children—Catherine and John—died.

Equally important in the poetic life of Wordsworth was his 1795 meeting with the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. It was with Coleridge that Wordsworth published the famous Lyrical Ballads (J. & A. Arch) in 1798. While the poems themselves are some of the most influential in Western literature, it is the preface to the second edition that remains one of the most important testaments to a poet’s views on both his craft and his place in the world. In the preface Wordsworth writes on the need for “common speech” within poems and argues against the hierarchy of the period which valued epic poetry above the lyric.

Wordsworth’s most famous work, The Prelude (Edward Moxon, 1850), is considered by many to be the crowning achievement of English romanticism. The poem, revised numerous times, chronicles the spiritual life of the poet and marks the birth of a new genre of poetry. Although Wordsworth worked on The Prelude throughout his life, the poem was published posthumously. Wordsworth spent his final years settled at Rydal Mount in England, travelling and continuing his outdoor excursions. Devastated by the death of his daughter Dora in 1847, Wordsworth seemingly lost his will to compose poems. William Wordsworth died at Rydal Mount on April 23, 1850, leaving his wife Mary to publish The Prelude three months later.


Selected Bibliography

Poetry

An Evening Walk (1793)
Descriptive Sketches (1793)
Borders (1795)
Lines Written Above Tintern Abbey (1798)
Lyrical Ballads (J. & A. Arch, 1798)
Upon Westminster Bridge (1801)
Intimations of Immortality (1806)
Miscellaneous Sonnets (1807)
Poems I-II (1807)
The Excursion (1814)
The White Doe of Rylstone (1815)
Peter Bell (1819)
The Waggoner (1819)
The River Duddon (1820)
Ecclesiastical Sketches (1822)
Memorials of a Tour of the Continent (1822)
Yarrow Revisited (1835)
The Prelude Or Growth of a Poet’s Mind (Edward Moxon, 1850)
The Recluse (1888)
The Poetical Works (1949)
Selected Poems (1959)
Complete Poetical Works (1971)
Poems (1977)

Prose

Prose Works (1896)
Literary Criticism (1966)
Letters of Dorothy and William Wordsworth (1967)
Letters of the Wordsworth Family (1969)
Prose Works (1974)
The Love Letters of William and Mary Wordsworth (1981)

Essays

Essay Upon Epitaphs (1810).

The world is too much with us; late and soon,

Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—

Little we see in Nature that is ours;

We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!

This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;

The winds that will be howling at all hours,

And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;

For this, for everything, we are out of tune;

It moves us not. Great God! I’d rather be

A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;

So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,

Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;

Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;

Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.

5. “She Walks in Beauty” – Lord Byron

She walks in beauty, like the night

Of cloudless climes and starry skies;

And all that’s best of dark and bright

Meet in her aspect and her eyes;

Thus mellowed to that tender light

Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,

Had half impaired the nameless grace

Which waves in every raven tress,

Or softly lightens o’er her face;

Where thoughts serenely sweet express,

How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,

So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,

The smiles that win, the tints that glow,

But tell of days in goodness spent,

A mind at peace with all below,

A heart whose love is innocent!

SOURCE: https://www.theodysseyonline.com/best-famous-poems-ever-written

https://poets.org/poet/william-wordsworth

With respect.