VALUABLE LESSONS FROM MANAGEMENT LEGEND PETER F. DRUCKER’S 5 RULES FOR THE AMBITIOUS.

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Let’s recall with honour, the management legend, Peter F. Drucker. When I was doing my undergraduate in my college days, my professor Sundaramoorthy taught us principles of management. My professor talked more about Henri Fayol and Peter F. Drucker’s management principles. In that initial point, I started paying more attention on the management side. My personal initiative, as a writer, I started sharing a few points on the Essential Manager’s Manual. You can see Saturday’s blog post. Over the last 2 months, I could not. I came back to my hometown. Probably, I should carry the manual. Unfortunately, I couldn’t.

A few weeks before, I decided to share the legendary Drucker’s principles. The first thing I have done is, searching for Drucker’s documentary on YouTube. I saw a few videos. Then I started searching Drucker’s management and decided to write the experiences the way I came into the management. There are enormous management principles to share. Foremost, I would like to go with “Rules for the Ambitious”.

Finally, I sincerely encourage you all to read Drucker’s books. It’s extremely informative.

I’m gonna paste the source link down below. I sincerely encourage you all to visit further.

Drucker’s 5 Rules for the Ambitious

Drucker’s Rules for the Way to the Top

Drucker followed several rules which included ideas from strategy, sales, and marketing.

  1. Hit’em Where They Ain’t

Drucker called the first rule “Hit’em Where They Aint.”  Named for an old-time baseball player, “Wee Willie Keeler,” who made the Baseball Hall of Fame not by hitting home runs, but by his batting average which holds records even today, eighty years later.

His strategy was simple: hit the ball to parts of the field not well protected by opposing players either because the player was less skillful or had a habit of not fully covering a part of his assigned area on the baseball field.

Every batter tried for fame by hitting the thrown pitch of a ball with his bat as hard as he could and trying for a home run. Wee Willie Keeler instead strived to hit the ball to areas of the outfield that were ill-protected. He “Hit’em Where They Ain’t.” It’s like the now famous, “Blue Ocean Strategy.” Go where the competition is not.

  1. Take the Lessons from one Industry and Apply Them to Another

Drucker maintained that major advances in any field or in industry usually came from someone bringing it from another field or industry and he applied this principle. For example, in his book Management Challenges for the 21st Century he wrote “the management of people is a marketing job.” He did not mean only to incorporate the persuasion of a salesperson, he meant the whole of marketing including considerations of all marketing aspects that must be included in the management situation including marketing strategy and planning.

  1. Be Your Own CEO

Drucker maintained that you need to be the one in charge of your career. This means that you look at the facts and do the analysis and you make and take responsibility for the decisions which you make. If you think that you need additional training or education, you don’t sit around waiting for someone else in your organization to make that decision to send you somewhere to get it.

Take whatever action to get what you think necessary yourself. Don’t take actions or various jobs solely because others have been successful that way. Think it through and make your own decisions. Drucker frequently attempted the impossible and achieved the extraordinary as an outcome

  1. Follow the Way of Innovation

Make your plans to be a change leader and innovate as you proceed on your journey. You must innovate. It is essential for your progress and like an organization that does not innovate, no matter how successful that you are currently, you will ultimately fail if you do not.

  1. Apply the Concepts of Marketing and Sales to Your Career

Drucker meant these should be applied as if coming from another industry. He devoted an entire course once to a subject that he called “Marketing Yourself to Your Boss.”

He was serious about this. I still recall him saying that you first had to agree with your boss on what your job was and if possible to get it in writing, and then you were to discover how your boss preferred to communicate. Drucker said that all of us prefer to communicate in one of two ways: either in writing or verbally. He went on to say it was critically important to communicate with the boss in the way in which he or she preferred.

He did not recommend participating in office politics and even avoided faculty meetings almost entirely for this reason. If you want to emulate Drucker and have an interest in reaching the very top, consider how you might apply these rules in your own career. They can be followed by anyone who has the ambition and willingness to go as far as the can in a profession.

*Adapted from the forthcoming book: Peter Drucker’s Way to the Top by William A. Cohen (LID, 2018)

SOURCE: https://www.managementmattersnetwork.com/strategic-leadership/columns/druckers-5-rules-for-the-ambitious

With respect.

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL. BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

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Next, we came to the topic called,

MANAGING TIME:

Understanding Time:

Time is our most valuable resource. By analysing time usage on a regular basis, it is possible to understand the most efficient ways to use time, both in and out of the workplace.

ANALYZING TIME:

People’s attitudes towards time are complex and variable. If you want to use your time effectively to accomplish all that you need to do that work and at home, you need to aware of the current habits and attitudes that shape your use of time.

POWER TIPS:

  1. Set aside time each day to review and prioritize demands on your time.
  2. Take a small chunk of a difficult task, and deal with straight away.

CULTURAL DIFFERENCES:

Perceptions of time and its usage may vary worldwide. Differences are often reflected in the average number of hours worked per day or week, the importance of punctuality, or time spent on leisure activities. Be prepared to adapt to others’ practices and timetables when working abroad.

 

With respect.

 

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

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COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

Checking your message gets through:

If you are communicating to improve perceptions, you need to check how your message is received. Managers are often very bad of this. Remember there is only one reliable source of information on perceptions: the recipients of the messages.

POWER TIPS:

  • Talk honesty to staff if you want to get honest answers in return.
  • If more than one or two make the same complaint, it may be widespread.
  • If you get only positive feedback, it may well not be the whole truth.

GETTING USEFUL FEEDBACK:

How feedback is transmitted, and what happens in response to it, is basic to effective communication. Always act promptly when you get feedback. Also, hold team meetings regularly to check that feedback is well used.

 

With respect.

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE:

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COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

Communicating at Work: The techniques used for external communication can also be used effectively inside an organization, though on a much smaller scale budget. Exploit these methods to ensure that messages reach your staff with real impact.

POWER TIPS:

  • Attend social events at work to get informal staff feedback.
  • Get professional advice on media techniques you can use internally.
  • Use logos on all stationery to promote company awareness.
  • Find out which colleague are most skilled at communicating.

USING DIFFERTENT MEDIA INSIDE AN ORGANIZATION:

TYPE OF MEDIUM:

  1. HANDOUTS: Including questionnaires, notices, and memos.
  2. MEETINGS AND SOCIAL EVENTS: Including team meetings, sales conferences, and product launches.
  3. PUBLICATIONS: Including glossy magazines, and desktop-published news sheets.
  4. ELECTRONIC: Including Wed sites, intranets, and other electronic networks.
  5. TELEVISUAL: Including videos, closed-circuit TV, and multimedia.

 

With respect.

 

 

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6f

COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

ADVERTISING EFFECTIVELY:

The creative ideas and designs of good advertisments (which can be in any medium) must always to linked to a clear, measurable selling purpose. Ensure that your advertising gives potential customers a good reason to buy your product or services.

POWER TIPS:

  • Make sure your product matches the promise, or advertising will fail.
  • Target your advertising for maximum impact.
  • Be as creative as possible – you can succeed on a small budget.
  • Use panels of customers to test advertisements before release.

COMPANY WEBSITES:

Use your site on the World Wide Web to sell products, advertise and provide information. You may take spots on other people sites, even if you have your own.

 

With respect.

 

VALAUBLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6f

Apologizes, my respected readers. To be continued from last week topic. Using Public Relations. I haven’t mentioned the topic. So, please see that particular post comment section. I had mentioned.

COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

Comes under Using Public relations:

POWER TIPS:

  • Buy and read newspapers and magazines you want to influence.
  • Treat cameras and microphones as if they were friendly people.
  • If you have good relationship with the press, exploit it to the full.

CONVEYING THE RIGHT MESSAGE:

When talking to journalists, think before you make a response; give straight-forward answers, and speak with confidence.

USING STATISTICS:

Readers, TV viewers, and radio listeners are always impressed my statistics, even when they cannot check their relevance or accuracy. Indeed, the more statistics you can muster in support of an argument, whether in a newspaper article or during an interview for broadcasting, the more convincing it will appear to an audience.

 

With respect.

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6f

COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

All managers have to consider the public impact of their actions. Public relations (PR) is used to describe the way issues and messages are communicated between an organization and the public. Handle PR internally, or employ experts.

POWER TIPS:

  • Get your PR people to handle potentially difficult media situations.
  • If you meet a hostile journalist, keep your cool; say nothing that could damage good PR.
  • If bad news breaks, admit the reality to everyone – especially yourself.

The most effective advertising is favorable is word-of-mouth: this free promotion should be one of PR’s main objectives.

BRIEFING CONSULTANTS:

When you initially employ a PR company, introduce the PR consultants to the relevant personnel in your organization. Explain the brief and check that the consultants know whom to contact in future of the need arises.

 

With respect.

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL. BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6f

COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

Communicating for Results;

The challenge to managers today lies in knowing how to exploit different types of media and use them to influence the public most effectively.

CREATING AN IDENTITY:

A corporate identity is what enables an organization to be easily recognized by the public and within industry, and helps to establish its position in the market. If your budget allows, enlist the services of a designer or consultant to create an identity.

POWER TIPS:

  • Keep vision and mission statements short and action-oriented.
  • Get the opinion of the trusted outsiders before finalizing a new logo.
  • Check large corporate web sites to see what others are doing.

The World Wide Web is a major source of corporate information, and often provides product and services news as well. Anybody can develop a site.

 

With respect.

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6f

COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

Making a visual impact:

Even the most promising proposal or report can suffer from poor layout, graphics, or typography. Similarly, a brilliantly designed document carries greater – perhaps decisive – impact. If practical, use professionals for this kind of work.

POWER TIPS:

  • Add meaningful headlines and captions – people read them first.
  • Use colour images, graphs, and charts in documents when possible.
  • Keep an eye on design work as it progresses so you can head off errors or re-brief early.

POINTS TO REMEMBER:

  • Using many different fonts at the same time can lead to a confusing overall look.
  • Legibility is very important – the type should not be too small.
  • A well-designed document is one that you enjoy looking at, but that also serves its function.

 

With respect.

VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL. BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6f

COMMUNICATING CLEARLY:

Writing proposals:

A proposal differs from a report in that it is a selling document, which should persuade readers to commit to whatever you are proposing. You could use an internal proposal, for example, to argue for extra company investment in computers or staff.

POWER TIPS:

  • Enlist allies in preparing and lobbying for your proposal.
  • Ask yourself honestly why one proposal might fall and another might succeed.
  • Use soft-sell techniques to get your proposal accepted.

DRAFTING A PROPOSAL:

It says stage by stage:

Set out the proposal.

Explain why it is needed and what it contributes.

Estimate the resources required, and show how the proposal meets financial criteria.

Specify who will be responsible and the proposal’s timescale.

Conclude with the plan of action.

CREATING PLANS:

Make sure your business plan looks professional. Include title and content pages, and bind the plan securely between the covers.

 

With respect.