10 LESSONS TO LEARN FROM ROMAN EMPEROR MARCUS AURELIUS:

equestrian-statue-of-marcus-aurelius-at-capitoline-museumWhen I started watching some of the philosophical videos on YouTube. Though, I still have misunderstandings about philosophies. I’m still on the way towards learning, understanding and finally, self-realizing. I got few videos about Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius about self-discipline and power of one’s own mind. These videos are still my YouTube offline videos. Even more, I’m too curious to buy Emperor Marcus Aurelius’ books, precisely book name known as ‘Meditations’. I sincerely encourage everyone to deep dive into more.

I’m not gonna say neither luckily nor coincidently. I need to say, a bit law of attraction happens here. As I said to buy this book, but the lessons, I’m gonna re-share are taken from the book Meditations.

So, quite happy.

This post is the very long wait to post. I was thinking about this over half-an-year. I’m thinking about how I could convey in a better manner. Today is a good day to do it. And this is the right time too. No more procrastination.

I just started searching and researching the life lessons of this Roman Emperor.

Few glimpses, I’m would love to re-share. I gonna paste the source link in the down below. I sincerely encourage the readers to visit further.

Marcus Aurelius (121-180AD), also known as ‘the Philosopher’, was Roman emperor from 161-180AD.

He is a widely popular emperor who spent most of his reign on military campaigns. Marcus Aurelius was a wise leader, one of the wisest emperors, and would often sit in his tent to ponder and write.

He was not consumed by fame, power or wealth despite being emperor of the Roman Empire. Marcus concerned himself with all manners of deep questions; such as, how to live a good life, how to endure all that life throws at you and how to be in control of your emotions, amongst other questions. He was a reader and follower of Stoic philosophy. These questions fall under this branch of philosophy.

He had duty and public service to attend to. Yet, when he had the time, he would produce notes and writings on what would later be known as the book Meditations. Marcus Aurelius was a wise and respected emperor during his life. However, his writing is what we remember him for today.

About the Book

Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations is a series of notes, reflections and fragments of his thoughts surrounding Stoicism. During quiet times on his military campaigns, when he could, he would produce these private notes and tackle difficult but important questions.

The ideas in the book are not original but based on existing tenets of Stoic philosophy. Marcus reflected and wrote down his understanding of them. Thus, he left us with very wise and thoughtful ideas about many aspects of life.

Stoicism is a philosophy that teaches emotional stability and resilience so that we can face a challenging, cruel and unpredictable world. It advocates self-control so that we can combat frightening and all too common hardships that may befall us all in our lives. We can withstand these hardships if we are sensible about our expectations of life and reality.

Stoicism is a philosophy that teaches emotional stability and resilience so that we can face a challenging, cruel and unpredictable world. It advocates self-control so that we can combat frightening and all too common hardships that may befall us all in our lives. We can withstand these hardships if we are sensible about our expectations of life and reality.

Stoic philosophy helps us understand that having unrealistic expectations about our lives can cause us deep harm. Instead, we should learn to maintain control of our emotions. We should also be aware that, more often than not, we will have to undergo hard times.

Marcus Aurelius took great heed of these teachings, and much of Meditations urges for acceptance of an unchangeable universe, and the importance of mental strength and calmness when recognising this.

Here are 10 lessons to be learnt from Meditations:

  1. Be a good character, rather than wondering how to be it

“Don’t go on discussing what a good person should be. Just be one.”

  1. It is your thoughts that determine your well-being and fulfilment

“The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts.”

  1. You cannot change what happens in the world, but you can change what you think about it

“You have power over your mind – not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.”

  1. Be grateful for what you have

“When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive, to think, to enjoy, to love …”

  1. Live only and completely in the present

“Do every act of your life as though it were the very last act of your life.”

  1. Recognise that bad and unexpected things can happen to you, and you will be prepared for whatever comes your way

“How ridiculous and unrealistic is the man who is astonished at anything that happens in life.”

  1. No feet is too high, and no goal is too out of reach

“Because a thing seems difficult for you, do not think it impossible for anyone to accomplish.”

  1. Stop worrying about what other people think of you

“How much time he gains who does not look to see what his neighbour says or does or thinks, but only at what he does himself, to make it just and holy.”

  1. Value the right things in life and your life will have value

“A person’s worth is measured by the worth of what he values.”

  1. No matter what happens to us, we can and will all move on

“Though you break your heart, men will go on as before.”

 

SOURCES: https://www.learning-mind.com/marcus-aurelius-meditations-life-lessons/

 

With respect.

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