VALUABLE MANUAL: ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL. BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6fSaturday comes, here it is. This week the topic is,

EXCHANGING INFORMATION:

Face-to-face, phone, or written communications can range from open warfare to perfect agreement. In every case, choose the right communication method to achieve your aim.

MAKING CONTACT:

POWER TIP:

  • Stand up to greet or say goodbye to people – it is rude to stay seated.

A satisfactory end to an encounter can never be guaranteed, but a good start is always possible. Your words and demeanour significantly affect the reactions of others, so use welcoming words to help start all proceedings on a positive side.

POINTS TO REMEMBER:

  1. Initial greetings should be as welcoming as possible.
  2. All attendees at a meeting need to be introduced to each other at the outset.
  3. Meetings are best ended courteously, even if they involved disagreements.
  4. Behavioural and cultural differences (like whether it is customary to shake hands) should be respected at all times when travelling.

GREETING PEOPLE:

Follow up with an impression of polite pleasure (“It’s good to meet you”). This implies friendly intent. Even if hostilities are possible, a civil verbal start is always wise.

USING BODILY CONTACT:

Avoid offering a limp handshake, which may give you an impression of weakness. Be aware of cultural rules that affect greetings between sexes. For example, it may be inappropriate for men and women to make any physical contact. Watch your posture, too: rise to your feet when receiving guests, and stand straight.

  • Face each other making eye contact.
  • Use a two-arm goodbye to show warmth than a handshake on its own.
  • Stand up when saying goodbye.

ENDING MEETINGS:

Saying a warm goodbye.

Saying goodbye is likely to be a warmer experience than saying hello, especially if the encounter has been productive. In some countries, people are more likely to use physical contact, such as holding one of their arms when shaking.

 

With respect.

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