ESSENTIAL MANAGER’S MANUAL: BY ROBERT HELLER AND TIM HINDLE.

essential_managers_manual_1489540962_4ec11b6f

Today, Saturday (midnight) sounds silly. But, as I said every week, I’m sharing this manual a few notable points.

Today’s topic:

ASKING QUESTIONS:

How you ask questions is very important in establishing a basis of good communication. Why, what, how, and when are very powerful words. Use them often to seek, either from yourself or from others, the answers needed to manage effectively.

POWER TIPS:

  • Ask the specific question if you want to hear a specific answer.
  • Use open questions and to gain insight into other person’s character, and to invite a response.
  • Write a list of questions before you start a meeting.
  • Do not be afraid to pause while thinking of your next question.
  • Speak in as natural a tone as possible to create a warm environment.

KNOWING WHAT TO ASK:

The right questions open the door to knowledge and understanding. The art of questioning lies in which questions to ask when. As the meeting progress, tick off the answers you receive. If new questions occur to you while others are talking, note them down and raise them later.

CHOOSING QUESTIONS:

Keep asking questions until you are satisfied that you have received the answers you require. When asking prepared questions, watch out for clues in the answers that you can follow up later with a new set of questions.

CHOOSING DIFFERENT QUESTIONS FOR DIFFERENT RESPONSES:

TYPES OF QUESTIONS:

  • Open– not invite any answer, but opens up discussion.
  • Closed– must answer with yes or no, or with details with as appropriate.
  • Fact-finding– getting information for a particular subject.
  • Follow-up– get more information or elicit an opinion.
  • Feedback– aimed at getting a particular type of information.

STRIKING THE RIGHT TONE:

Your tone of voice is the part of communication in itself. The wrong tone may generate a counter-productive response. Using a tape recorder, play back your voice. Is there is any unintentional sharpness? Is it too conciliatory? Practice until you are happy with how you sound.

 

With respect.

 

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