STUDY TECHNIQUES: FEYNMAN’S TECHNIQUE.

feynman01-NEWS-WEB-k0SC--621x414@LiveMint

This is one of the most study technique used across the globe. If you are starting to learning this technique. You can learn but also you can teach others too. I supposed to see this as a Win-Win situation. You can understand and also make others understand in a simple manner.

This technique purely says about the simplicity of explaining.

If I’m writing, it should reach every reader in an understandable manner. It must not make chaos. It should not make a bad impact.

So, I started to research this technique as deep as. I’m writing now, I hope, I used Feynman’s technique.

The Feynman Technique is a mental model that was coined by Nobel-prize winning physicist Richard Feynman. Known as the “Great Explainer,” Feynman was revered for his ability to clearly illustrate dense topics like quantum physics for virtually anybody. In “Feynman’s Lost Lecture: The Motion of Planets Around the Sun, “David Goodstein writes that Feynman prided himself on being able to explain the most complex ideas in the simplest terms.

They called Feynman the “Great Explainer.”

Richard Feynman (1918–1988), an author, graphic novel hero, intellectual, philosopher, physicist, and No Ordinary Genius is considered to be one of the most important physicists of all time.

  • He pioneered an entire field: quantum electrodynamics (QED).
  • In the 1940s, his invention of the Feynman Diagram helped bring much-needed visual clarification to the enigmatic behaviour of subatomic particles.
  • His work helping scientists understand the interaction of light and matter earned him a share of a Nobel Prize in 1965.
  • His work has directly influenced the fields of nanotechnology, quantum computing, and particle physics.
  • In 1986, his research and explanations were critical in helping to understand the cause of the space shuttle Challenger disaster.

In addition to his ground-breaking research, Feynman was brilliant, eloquent, and an exquisitely passionate thinker. In the world of science, he stands unequivocally for his ability to synthesize and explain complex scientific knowledge. His lectures are the stuff of legend — Albert Einstein attended Feynman’s first talk as a graduate student, and Bill Gates was so inspired by his pedagogy that he called Feynman, “the greatest teacher I never had.” Gates purchased the rights to his lectures and made them publicly available on a video portal nicknamed “Tuva” in honour of Feynman’s famous failed quest to reach the Russian region later in his life.

“I do think that making science cool to people when they’re young and therefore getting more people to go into it in an in-depth way, I think that’s very important right now,” Gates said when announcing the purchase.

Feynman’s lectures, many of which were delivered during his time at California Institute of Technology, were aimed at students who had no previous knowledge of particle physics or deep science. Taking the mystery out of complex scientific principles was Feynman’s forte. His lectures were underscored by a conviction and passion for science.

THE FIRST PRINCIPLE IS THAT YOU MUST NOT FOOL YOURSELF AND YOU ARE THE EASIEST PEOPLE TO FOOL.

SAID BY RICHARD FEYNMAN.

When people talk about the Feynman Technique of problem-solving, they often quote Albert Einstein’s famous words:

“If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.”

The Feynman Technique is laid out clearly in James Gleick’s 1993 biography, “Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman.” In the book, Gleick explains the method in terms of how Feynman mastered his exams at Princeton University: “He opened a fresh notebook. On the title page, he wrote: NOTEBOOK OF THINGS I DON’T KNOW ABOUT. For the first but not last time he reorganized his knowledge. He worked for weeks at disassembling each branch of physics, oiling the parts, and putting them back together, looking all the while for the raw edges and inconsistencies. He tried to find the essential kernels of each subject.” This is the first part of his process, but let’s take a look at all four steps:

  1. IDENTIFY THE SUBJECT:

Whatever it is, don’t be hesitated. Even I started applying my passionate subjects.

Write it down in the notebook or piece of paper about the subject. And add it every time when you started to learn something about the chosen topic.

I would like to say on the first point. The main purpose is to learn and understand. So, you must keep on learning about the topic.

  1. TEACH SOMEONE ABOUT THE TOPIC:

Here the real key applies. Before teaching someone. You must use plain English. I mean, you must use simple vocabulary and simple and understandable definitions.

Even a child, could able to grasp.

There is one more way you can say,

If a child could able to understand what you are saying, you understood pretty well.

  1. If YOU ARE STUCK IN STEP 2, NO WORRIES. YOU CAN BOUNCE BACK AND RELEARN AND REREAD AGAIN:

There are enough possibilities you can fill the gaps. I mean, if you have struggled at a certain point. You can do more work in where you been slipped.

Again, go back. And start teaching.

  1. REPEAT THE PROCESS:

Go back to the notes. And simplify as much as possible. Keep looking.

How can I deliver to them?

Use simple analogy. Wherever possible.

THE BEST WAY TO NOT TO BE A FOOL IS:

  1. THINK CRITICALLY AND
  2. LEARN DEEPLY.

THE PURPOSE OF THE FEYNMAN TECHNIQUES:

  1. BE SIMPLE
  2. BE CONCISE

Feynman’s technique is also useful for those who find writing a challenge. Feynman had an interesting relationship with writing. Instead of committing his knowledge to paper like many other scientific figures, he chose to use speech as the foundation for many of his published works. He dictated most of his books and memoirs, and his scientific papers were transcribed from his lectures.

“In order to talk to each other, we have to have words, and that’s all right. It’s a good idea to try to see the difference, and it’s a good idea to know when we are teaching the tools of science, such as words, and when we are teaching science itself,” Feynman said.

Feynman relied heavily on verbal and spoken communication, and when he turned to his cartoonish diagrams of highly scientific principles, for example, he could tap into ideas with shapes, squiggly lines, and drawings. It stripped away the clunky language and allowed the power of verbal storytelling to take root.

 

With respect.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s